Bigfoot Culture – Part Four of Five of “Rising Wind Book Series: Rock My Soul” Exciting, Deep, Sighting, and Exchanges. Is This The Possible Next Book of The Series?

“More strong pattern of observations as a prelude to interaction with lots of help from Mateo Arguello, Glenn Norberg, and my cousin, Heidi… I hope you enjoyed reading Part One of this informative information on the sightings and research by my friends and family.”

Again, we know there have been many reports about this willy beast in many states like Washington, California, and Oregon forests. And in many other states in America and around the world. Could Bigfoots still be reproducing and growing families we don’t know about?

Well, it could be possible and explain the many sightings. So let’s dive into part four and see what else Mateo and others have to say, shall we? As they are still in the same area around “Garden of the Gods” in Colorado Springs, CO.

~Author Diane Olsen writer of the Multi-Award-Winning Series Rising Wind.

“Garden of the Gods” CO., Springs


Pebbles and Apples

Mateo continues… “Six years after my first scary encounter, I was now hoping to interact with Sasquatch. I chose that space right up against the city at the start of the plains. I settled on a deer trail next to a spring, a prime spot for most animals to come through. I’d park in such a way that a dense patch of tall scrub oak would assure the hominids a safe approach to my vehicle if they decided to visit. Before, they had observed – then tried to interact with me. Now it was my turn to observe them and seek interactions. For three enjoyable months, my then-girlfriend and I spent our nights hanging out in this same spot. She thought it was something fun to do, a weird hobby I had.”

“Mateo”



Nothing out of the ordinary happened, and we became complacent. Even though we were respectful and careful, it took three months for the interactions to start, but suddenly there were very clear noises that didn’t sound like birds, rodents, or mule deer in the scrub oak and underbrush. We’d wait up listening carefully every single night, and at times our sleep was disturbed by the sounds of someone approaching our vehicle.

The day after the first noises, we saw evidence of broken brush, very subtle, small snaps on willow branches, just enough to expose the white bark so they could mark a pathway in the dark. They were about chest height, so a person could easily have made them. Mainly willows were marked, but when there were no willows, they would break the scrub oak. I slid back into the thought that it might be teens sneaking around, maybe building a shelter there for themselves.

The breaks crisscrossed the regular human trails and deer ruts. I followed them until they had just stopped, and there was nothing. I tried to dismiss the Sasquatch intuition. I wanted it to be teens or loners. For some reason, any other thought would have been terrifying. But if they were kids, it was odd that they would brave the really thick brush between primary paths for no apparent reason.

Following their trail was annoyingly inconvenient, and my only reward from the endeavor was that I scratched myself up, crisscrossing the original trails through the brushy undergrowth. This system could help observers stay clear of people and the main trails as they ran through the area on hidden paths which I found later on led to huge nest sites where I collected hair samples.

A couple of days later, just as the budding leaves opened, we started getting the pebble throws. It was dark; there was no moon. My girlfriend noticed it first. ‘Do you hear that? It sounds like someone is throwing rocks or pebbles at the Jeep.’ Then, I started hearing them too, and said, ‘You’re right. If it is them, let’s wait because they’ll keep doing it.

In the meantime, let’s eliminate any other things it might be, like the Jeep engine making little popping noises as it cooled down.’ We checked the engine and the wind. Nope, we couldn’t locate any other explanation for the noises. In my mind, I denied the pebbles and other incidents because the marked trails weren’t made for significant individuals like giant Sasquatch, and they were crisscrossing the usual paths.

The rocks were tossed from the trees alongside our Jeep, and we soon realized that they were explicitly used because someone was trying to get our attention. That first night they were hitting the jeep from multiple angles. Sometimes two would hit at the same time. We were sure there was more than one being, probably two or three. My stomach knotted; I was internally freaking out, but I didn’t show it outwardly. My girlfriend stammered, ‘Oh my God… oh my God, you were right!


Nothing occurred for three months, then all of a sudden, when I became complacent and doubtful, things began happening. It was overwhelming for both of us. The pebble throws became pretty intense. I had wanted stability to learn more about them, but now I felt scared, surrounded. Imagine trying to face and contain your fear. The pebble throws became even more intense for several nights in a row. 

It was clear that several individuals were concealed and were tossing pebbles from a variety of directions while we tried to sleep inside the vehicle. We’d hear multiple pings as stones hit the Jeep, simultaneously smacking the front, hitting from the sides, the windows, and the doors. By this point, the Sasquatches, probably juveniles, were making their intentions to interact unmistakably clear. Do you know how your stomach feels when you’re really freaking out? I don’t know how to describe it; there were knots in my stomach and my throat. I tried not to show my girlfriend, so I said, ‘Oh my gosh, the waiting experiment worked.’ 

Although I was scared, I was also excited about the success. When the behavior became really obvious, my girlfriend kept repeating, ‘Oh, my God, they exist, oh my God, you were right.’ That felt good even though I was afraid. ‘I told you they did; I told you so.’ And that was the beginning of a ridiculous month and a half of interactions and evidence collection. We experienced constant pebble smacking and faces peeking in the windows.

We found track impressions and fresh branch breaks in the willows up against the hills, right at the edge of Colorado Springs. Their trail network began to expand. Our visitors trampled sticks and brush to form these substantial nest sites deep in the brush. This was where I collected hair samples which you can see in my documentary. 


These largely hidden areas with several body impressions appeared to change locations every few days, confirming for me that these were not teens or kids. They had to be a group of these hominids. There were other new features. At one point, a bunch of branches had been broken almost parallel to the Jeep into a formation similar to a hedge row

At first, I thought it was a boundary marker – like don’t go beyond this point! But I reconsidered, and now I think it was a blind – a safe place for them to observe us. The branches had been broken right in line with the jeep to break up their profiles while they looked at us from that position.

“Mateo”



My focus was now on two-way interactive experiments, where I placed various things out for them to take, like the fuzzy wires used for crafts and decorations. I tried several things, but there were a lot of experiments where it didn’t look like anything was touched. After two weeks of getting pebbles thrown every night, I offered food as gifts to see what would happen. Everyone tries snacks to see if the Sasquatch will take them and to see what behaviors the gifts might elicit.

The apples most definitely got noticed. I decided to leave out four apples for our guests, and I bought bulk apples in a little net. I left four inside the netting, taking a bite out of one of them to assure our guests the food was safe to eat. Then I strung the net up next to a big tree on the path where they had made the blind. I used a branch that was seven or eight feet high, and I left a foot and a half lead on the rope to make sure squirrels or raccoons couldn’t get into it.

It was high enough that deer couldn’t get it either. We continued to hear the rocks hitting the Jeep, but even after three days, they hadn’t touched the fruit, even though they came through that area and looked at them every single night. Each morning we could see the grass was freshly pressed down, I thought maybe they didn’t know what apples were, or maybe they were scared, thinking they were ours. I didn’t know.


Finally, on the fourth day, I checked the whole perimeter to see if there were any subtle changes in the environment. Two of the apples are gone! They took the one I bit into and the one on the top and left the other two in the net. I was excited when I noticed they were taken from the top. The whole net was intact, with no tears or marks on it as if someone had tried to rip or bite through it. They went through the top without damaging the net and only took two, which is unusual for most animals.

Raccoons have been known to leave some, then come back later for the rest. But there was no evidence that other known animals had taken any, and it was unlikely other creatures were around because we were still getting pebbles thrown. So, I got the impression they were being polite – sharing the offering with us. I was excited about the fact they left the two apples because it might indicate that they understood sharing and counting – perhaps they were just trying to divide the food equally – was that evidence of calculation and math?

Maybe they left two for the two humans…


The next night when the pebbles started hitting the Jeep again, I came outside, and I took one of the apples and made gestures for about five minutes to assure them they were welcome to all of the apples; I returned to the car and the pebbles stopped. This time they obliged, understanding they could have them all. Fifteen minutes later, we heard a ‘yahoo,’ a yip of excitement – and then heard a curt ‘Woo!’ in a much deeper voice – everything got quiet as if a parent was cautioning a juvenile.

We entertained the idea, but we could be wrong, that what transpired was that one of the juveniles who was interacting with us took the apples up to mom and let out that “yahoo,” then mom told her or him to be quiet with that short ‘woo.’ Like, ‘Shut up!’ The next day when I checked, of course, and sure enough, the other two apples were gone, and the net was still there. 

That was the only time I used the apples because I didn’t want the food to become a focal point, and I didn’t want to run the risk of developing aggressive behavior from a sustained expectation of food. I felt they already experienced enough interaction from us with the pebble throws because the pebble throws were a game. When we stopped doing it in response, they got more dramatic to get our attention. That was already working well enough, so I didn’t want to add another factor with food and potentially have to escalate adverse side effects.

We tried to catch them watching us with a thermal camera, but my girlfriend was traumatized to see a figure walking beside me to my left on the thermal. The worst part is that I forgot to tell her how to snap images with the camera, so we had no visible proof of the experience, just her mental anguish from what she’d observed.

In the end, I realized that I had to relax in order for them to try interactive activities. I had no experience when I was tense or on guard, in my PTSD mode, looking over my shoulder with a defensive posture – nothing. It wasn’t until I had this friendly demeanor, let my guard down, and wasn’t paying attention to external factors that interactions started to happen. 

Now I’m allowing myself to be available to the creatures, but it takes time and patience to politely wait for them – as one might with a hunter-gatherer group. It is the best way to do it. Waiting can be very difficult, but it works. People have been successful when they waited in a spot and built a rapport like they would with any wild creature.

Of course, it only works when the Sasquatches use manners – and we use manners – signs of mutual respect.


The next post will be Part Five — The Finale of this article series. You will read the sharing of Hiedi’s story and the experiences she’s had with Bigfoot…

I hope you are enjoying this article series, and it just might be a new up-and-coming book from me! You never know… ~Diane Olsen


Visit & Connect with the author: WebsiteFacebookTwitterGoodreadsAmazon,
The Rising Wind Book Series Is Available Now on Amazon >> https://www.amazon.com/Like-Feathers-Wing-Informative-Pertinent-ebook/dp/B09V3KXJJS/


More References to Mateo’s video links for some of the incidents can be found here.

“Thank God, it never looked back at me” Video: https://youtu.be/XCatOc5jDKw

“Snow white sasquatch encounter”https://youtu.be/1yfGfLsQkWU

Beaver creek sas p1https://youtu.be/seXyWmV7cLc

P2: https://youtu.be/5B74cSB4Uf0

Gargoylehttps://youtu.be/AgOcw50gyc4










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